Could Implantable Glucose Sensors be a Viable Option for Monitoring Blood Sugar?

Diabetes management has come a long way over the years. Some people have transitioned away from constant finger pricks and begun using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems to track their blood sugar and alert them to episodes of hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. However, not everyone has the same level of adherence to using this technology, so results can be inconsistent.

Researchers from Diablo Clinical Research recently conducted a study on the use of implantable, subcutaneous continuous glucose sensors for diabetes management. A small sensor was placed under the skin, and then a transmitter was positioned over top providing wireless power and transmission of data to a mobile app. The transmitter also vibrated to alert users of episodes of hyper- or hypoglycemia in addition to alerts being sent to the app.

There were 90 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who participated in the nonrandomized, prospective, masked, single-arm study which lasted for 90 days. Sixty-one of the participants had type 1 diabetes. Individuals underwent accuracy assessment visits on days 1, 30, 60, and 90 to compare results of the implantable sensor versus a bedside glucose analyzer. In addition, some participants also partook in hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia challenges on days 30, 60, and 90. There were only eight participants who did not complete the study, and 12 reports of mild adverse events and two moderate adverse events.

Following the study, the results showed “more than 90% of continuous glucose monitoring system readings within 20% of reference values.” Furthermore, “the system correctly identified 93% of hypoglycemic events and 96% of hyperglycemic events by the reference glucose reader.” The implantable CGM system used was Eversense by Senseonics.

Additional clinical studies are necessary to further evaluate the safety and accuracy of the system and expand potential use to pediatric patients as well. However, preliminary results show high levels of safety and accuracy in this small study.

This is an exciting step toward providing individuals with T1D another option for managing diabetes allowing them to measure blood sugar levels more consistently and with less intervention. The Diabetes Research Connection (DRC) is interested to see how this study advances moving forward and what it may mean for diabetes management in the future. The DRC raises funds for early career scientists to perform peer-reviewed, novel research designed to prevent and cure type 1 diabetes, minimize its complications, and improve quality of life for those living with the disease. To learn more and support these efforts, visit http://diabetesresearchconnection.org.

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