Single Strand of Islet Cells Could Change Diabetes Management

For patients with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections become a way of life. Since the pancreas either does not produce enough or any insulin, and the body’s immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells, the body is unable to regulate blood sugar on its own. There are many studies underway examining potential treatments that would eliminate the need for regular insulin injections.

One such study is being conducted by researchers at Cornell University in collaboration with Novo Nordisk and the University of Michigan Medical School. The researchers have developed an implant that would enable the production of insulin while warding off an attack from the immune system. The device is a single thread covered with “hundreds of thousands of islet cells” that is then fully encased in hydrogel. The hydrogel not only keeps the islets in place, it also protects them from being damaged.

The thread does not adhere to tissue within the body, so it can be easily removed and replaced once the islet cells reach the end of their lifespan. Current research shows they could potentially last anywhere from several months up to two years. This device has shown promising results when tested in both mice and dogs. No testing on humans has taken place yet, which would need to be done before the technology is potentially approved for use.

Technology continues to advance when it comes to treating and managing type 1 diabetes, and this is very encouraging. The Diabetes Research Connection strives to support early career scientists in conducting novel research studies focused on type 1 diabetes in order to improve the quality of life for individuals living with the disease and enhance diagnosis, prevention, and treatment efforts. To learn more, visit http://diabetesresearchconnection.org.

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